18-22 July 2016
Hotel Wyndham Grand Axelmannstein, Bad Reichenhall, Germany
Europe/Berlin timezone

Metal oxide surfaces: case study on Fe3O4

Not scheduled
15m
Hotel Wyndham Grand Axelmannstein, Bad Reichenhall, Germany

Hotel Wyndham Grand Axelmannstein, Bad Reichenhall, Germany

Salzburger Str. 2-6 83453 Bad Reichenhall
Catalysis

Speaker

Dr Heshmat Noei (DESY NanoLab, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany)

Description

Magnetite (Fe3O4) is one of the most important transition metal oxides found with wide industrial applications due to its surface reactivity, as well as its exceptional electronic and magnetic properties. It is involved in the catalysis of the water–gas shift reaction, Fischer–Tropsch synthesis, and it also raised some interest due to its possible application for groundwater remediation and in spintronic devices. Since these applications depend on the surface structure of the material, a correct description is fundamental for a deeper understanding of the processes involved. In this contribution, we studied the atomic structure and the interaction of organic molecules with magnetite. The binding of simplest carboxylic acid, formic acid (HCOOH), to magnetite is studied as an important model system with regard to understanding the grafting of more complex molecules via carboxylate groups. Furthermore, the adsorption and interaction of large molecules with magnetite show the formation of nanocomposites. The self-assembly of nearly spherical iron oxide nanoparticles in supercrystals linked together by a thermally induced crosslinking reaction of oleic acid molecules leads to a nanocomposite with exceptional bending modulus, hardness and strength.

Primary author

Dr Heshmat Noei (DESY NanoLab, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany)

Co-authors

Prof. Andreas Stierle (DESY NanoLab, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany and Physics Department, University of Hamburg, D-20355 Hamburg, Germany) Mr Björn Arndt (DESY NanoLab, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany and Physics Department, University of Hamburg, D-20355 Hamburg, Germany)

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