Dec 8 – 10, 2020 Online only
Online event
Europe/Berlin timezone

Following the diffusive processes during a non-classical protein crystallization via neutron spectroscopy

Dec 10, 2020, 4:45 PM
15m
Online event

Online event

Talk DN: Life Science/ Biology DN2020: Life Science/ Biology

Speaker

Christian Beck (Institut Laue Langevin)

Description

Following dynamics during kinetically changing samples is a major challenge. With recent developments of analysis frameworks, accessing the short-time self-diffusive properties of protein solutions by measuring specific energy transfers (FWS) via neutron backscattering, kinetically changing samples can be investigated. More detailed information (internal dynamics and immobile fraction of the proteins) can be extracted from full QENS spectra obtained with a floating average with a lower kinetic time resolution. The immobile fraction, determined by multi-dimensional fits, can be assigned to proteins in a gel-like state or in crystals [1].
Here, we discuss the results of a study performed during crystallization. CdCl$_2$ induces a non-classical crystallization process [2,3] of $\beta$-lactoglobulin (BLG) with a metastable intermediate phase. We investigated the short-time collective and self-diffusion of BLG by neutron spin-echo (IN11), FWS and QENS (IN16b), respectively, of the crystallization process for different sample conditions. Combining the different results, a consistent picture of the process can be drawn, which differs significantly from classical BLG crystallization induced by ZnCl$_2$ [1]. This implies a strong influence of seemingly subtle cation-specific effects on protein crystallization.
[1] C. Beck, et al., Cryst. Growth Des. 2019
[2] A. Sauter, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015
[3] A. Sauter, et.al., Faraday Discuss. 2015

Primary author

Christian Beck (Institut Laue Langevin)

Co-authors

Mr Ralph Maier (Institut für Angewandte Physik) Olga Matsarskaia Fajun Zhang (University of Tuebingen) Tilo Seydel (Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin) Frank Schreiber (Institut für Angewandte Physik, Universität Tübingen, Germany)

Presentation materials